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20100907
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WETA 7
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
WETA
Sep 7, 2010 6:00pm EDT
-- >> what happened in france is being watched closely, because europe faces us see us strikes as governments bareback cherished benefits. bbc news, paris. >> the spanish prime minister and has called on a basket separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. -- of basque separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. mozambique has reversed its decision to raise bread prices by 30%. food riots last week left 13 dead. bread will now be sold at its previous price of 14 cents. every year since 1998, more than 30,000 japanese people have killed themselves. japan's health ministry estimates cases of suicide and depression caused the economy $32 billion last year. the government has launched a task force to address the problem. more than two weeks of political deadlock have ended in australia with confirmation that labor's julia gillard will continue as prime minister, would be backing, at last, of to independenct mp's. she has been near west possible majority. nick bryant has this. >> it is like the finale of a tv reality show, with the winner kept a closely-guarded secret until announced l
WETA
Sep 7, 2010 6:30pm EDT
evening, everybody, and thanks for joining us. too little too late. susie, that's the initial reaction from some business leaders to president obama's latest proposal to give tax breaks for businesses. >> susie: tom, the president will detail the plan tomorrow in cleveland. he's proposing that companies write off 100% of their investments in plants and equipment through next year. >> tom: the administration estimates the plan would cut business taxes by about $200 billion over the next two years. for some businesses, this "expensing" proposal could amount to a half-off sale on new equipment. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: you've probably heard about all those businesses sitting on their money, waiting for things to get better. the president's expensing plan could give executives an incentive to make a big purchase, says small business advocate todd mccracken. >> and what that does is it uses up a lot of extra cash that especially a lot of big companies seem to have right now bur that they're not using, they're not investing. and that has the potential to create jobs. >> reporter: b
WETA
Sep 6, 2010 11:00pm EDT
" that they were two of the most pivotal works of his career. i think it's important he used the word "pivotal" and not "important." it suggests there was a change that those works brought about in his career and i think that's part of what that radical invention is about. >> i think this was someone who had regularly changed but had done so in this period far more extreme than he'd ever done before. and clearly part of this was him coming back and engaging more in the art world of paris after having really spent the previous two years not wanting to be engaged in it. finding that younger artists, cubist artists, were now at the forefront of affairs and feeling that he's being pushed a bit back in time and feeling that even if he didn't feel so sympathetic with what they were doing, he knew that he was going to engage with what they were doing and learn what he could. and then also, of course, the other great thing that happened in that time-- or rather not so great-- was the outbreak of world war i. and i think he felt in this period that he wasn't allowed to fight in the war because he was d
WETA
Sep 7, 2010 7:00pm EDT
to get their agenda through. they said don't run away from us yet. we're eight weeks away from election day. you see a lot of democrats in very tough districts really starting to put distance between themselves and the national democrats, president obama, speaker pelosi. >> lehrer: you also believe looking further at those polls about dissatisfaction with government. there's stuff in there that needs to be noted as well, correct some. >> awe-i have looked all year long. it's this volatility, almost anger that exists inside the electorate. take a look at these numbers because this is fascinating when you look at it through history. today 78% of respondents say tler dissatisfied or angry with government and how government works versus 22% who are satisfied or enthusiastic. compare that, jim, to november 1994. you remember bill clinton was president. newt gingrich, the republican revolution and the takeover of the house of representatives, you are seeing more dissatisfaction and anger in the electorate now than you did when republicans won 54 seats and took over the house. >> lehrer: now t
WETA
Sep 7, 2010 12:00am EDT
stars in the movie "lovely still," a film he also produces. we're glad you could join us. >> all i know is his name is james. he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference. >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley with every question and answer. nationwide is proud to join tavis in working with literacy. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: eight weeks from tomorrow, americans are l head to the polls in all 50 states in an election that could alter the balance of power in the house and senate and have an impact on the presidential campaign come 2012. i'm joined now by susan page, washington bureau chief of "u.s.a. today". she joins us tonight where where else, d.c. good to have you on this program. >> good to be here. tavis: fair or not fair to suggest this is one of the most closely watched midterms in a long time. >> it reminds me of 1994, clinton's midterm. t
WETA
Sep 7, 2010 12:30am EDT
evening, everyone, and thanks for joining us for this labor day special edition. the jobs picture just keeps getting worse. tom, back in january, the economy was adding jobs and the recovery was gaining momentum. then europe's debt woes exploded and the global recovery came to a grinding halt. >> tom: susie, the latest employment numbers aren't much help. 54,000 jobs disappeared from u.s. payrolls in august, and the unemployment rate hit 9.6 >> susie: so how bad is the employment picture, and how long will it take to get back to where we were before the recession started? suzanne pratt puts it in perspective. >> reporter: it seems lately that signs like these are extremely hard to come by. even though the great recession may technically be over, the labor market is far from recovered. the nation's unemployment rate hit 10% late last year and has hovered just below there ever since. but economist dan greenhaus says that widely quoted number understates the magnitude of the job crisis and the inequalities within it. >> if you're an advanced degree white guy working not in construction, y
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)